Origami is the art of paper folding, which is often associated with Japanese culture. In modern usage, the word "origami" is used as an inclusive term for all folding practices, regardless of their culture of origin. The goal is to transform a flat sheet square of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques.

Perhaps the most well known origami model is the crane. It has become the international symbol of peace. In Japan every child eventually learns to make the crane. Eleanor Coerr is credited with popularizing the crane with her book, "Sadako and 1,000 Paper Cranes."

Computational origami is a type of computer program for modeling the ways in which various materials, including paper, can be folded. Such programs have been used for a variety of purposes, including engineering applications.

The principles of geometry were first applied to origami around the mid-twentieth century, when Japanese physicists and mathematicians began to formulate axioms (self-evident truths) that explain how folding creates three dimensional objects from a flat material.